Jan
12

Finding Ecstasy in Absurdity

By

The merry-go-round in the sky spins round

And up and down while spinning around

And sometimes it breaks down.

Never pausing, never ending, chaos roams the universe.

Galaxies collide, stars dim, black holes devour everything.

Nations plan for war as casually as state dinners.

Ironically named smart bombs annihilate wedding parties, and red rain falls.

Love grows bitter with treason, hearts harden like stone when love stalls.

Heroin shooting parents torment their children, raging people pumping bullets;

Chaos everywhere—in meditation gardens earthworms mobbed by ants die deaths of a thousand cuts; locusts strip clean fields of green; bacteria feeds on everything; the earth rumbles and cities crumble; the wind blows and homes explode; unremitting rain drowns everything on the plain.

As the earth spins round love can be found—and Puccini Arias, morning mists in flower fields, acceptance, compassion, and authenticity.

We ask: why soak the earth with blood? 

What drives depression, suicide and genocide?

Why born one way, commanded to be another?

Why pain, why sorrow?

Why not always Puccini Arias, morning mists in flower fields, acceptance, love, compassion and authenticity?

Like the Oracle at Delphi, theologians and philosophers answer us—don’t kill, don’t steal don’t lie; love one another; don’t mess with another’s mate; do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

To escape from suffering, contemplate beauty, sympathize with others and self discipline yourself.

The noted philosopher, Spinoza, reminded us that whenever anything in nature seems to us ridiculous, absurd or evil it is because we have but a partial knowledge of things.

The Indian mystic, Krishnamurti, urges: don’t philosophize just be aware, just be—and toxic emotions will slip away.

THE LAST WORD

Just be he said, silk blouse unbuttoning

I am she said, slippery blouse sliding to the floor

Uncertainty both admitting.

 When fully aware we just are, she said

Perception without toxic emotions, he said

Uncertainty receding, let’s fuck she said

Ancient China Teaches Acceptance

A man named Sei Weng owned a beautiful mare which was praised far and wide.

One day this beautiful horse disappeared.

The people of his village offered sympathy to Sei Weng for his great misfortune.

Sei Weng said simply, “That’s the way it is.”

A few days later the lost mare returned, followed by a beautiful wild stallion.

The village congratulated Sei Weng for his good fortune.

He said, “That’s the way it is.”

Some time later, Sei Weng’s only son, while riding the stallion, fell off and broke his leg.

The village people once again expressed their sympathy at Sei Weng’s misfortune.

Sei Weng again said, “That’s the way it is.”

Soon thereafter, war broke out and all the young men of the village except Sei Weng’s lame son were drafted and were killed in battle.

The village people were amazed as Sei Weng’s good luck.

His son was the only young man left alive in the village.

But Sei Weng kept his same attitude: despite all the turmoil, gains and losses, he gave the same reply, “That’s the way it is.”

So where does all this leave us?

Emptying ourselves of toxic emotions and accepting fate, we see realms of beauty and serenity with clear bright eyes opened wide.

Joy beckons and fills up our senses. Primordial energy absorbs us like a raindrop falling into the cosmic sea and we find ecstasy in absurdity.

AWARENESS EXERCISE

While in a comfortable position prepare yourself for pondering.

Picture yourself trying to decide what clothes to wear, what food to eat, where to go, what to do, how to behave, how to pay the bills, what’s right and what’s wrong.

Observe the effect this activity has upon your mind, your body and your heart.

Picture yourself in a place you consider peaceful and calm: an alpine mountain with pine fragrance in the air at sunrise, a redwood forest, a bluff overlooking the ocean, or a church.

If you can actually go there, that would even be better.

Mentally shed all your possessions and let your consciousness encompass the universe from the beginning of time to the end of time.

Let the boundaries of your consciousness dissolve and feel it blend in with the primordial Godhead.

If any emotions or judgments appear, let your consciousness observe them without any struggling.

Do not resist by thinking “I don’t want the emotions or thoughts.”

The emotions and the thoughts are “what is,” so just observe and let them dissipate like the morning mist while you joyfully expand into primordial energy. 

Here’s another one: Picture yourself on the planet Earth and visualize your atoms, particles, and underlying energy resonating and interacting with the energy of the Earth.

Feel yourself at one with the Earth.

Relax and just be aware without thinking or making judgments of any kind.

Picture the Earth, a mote of dust gliding into the void.

Let your awareness flow over the Earth, see it slde across the solar system, observe it spread over the Milky Way, the universe, and finally, feel it empty into the boundless sea of primordial energy.

See it and feel it until it becomes as real for you as the rising sun.

A classical Zen Awareness exercise:

Being chased by a hungry tiger you are forced to climb over a cliff and hang onto a vine.

One hundred feet below—two more hungry tigers are waiting for you to drop.

You spy a beautiful wild strawberry plant loaded with ripe berries glistening with dew.

You focus your attention on the berries and pick and eat them slowly one by one —how sweet they are!

Observe your state of mind.

Carry it a step further: the vine breaks and you fall with total awareness of the air flowing around you.

Again imagine yourself climbing over the cliff; this time you are screaming and cursing.

You don’t notice the strawberries; you lose your grip and claw and scream all the way down.

Death is inevitable.

Ponder on choosing which way you choose to die and note the choice which leaves you with the satisfied feeling that under the circumstances it is the best you can do.

Send your comments to me, Neil Bezaire, at neil@slk.us. I would enjoy hearing from you. Attention will be paid.

 

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